Day 351. Paint Your Pain

Heidi's Pain

It’s not arts-and-crafts day at the loonie bin.  Rather, Dr. A. Suggested that I paint my pain.  (That sounds a bit like self-contradiction, but just never mind).  He mentioned it before, but I could only conceive of it in abstract terms:  how will I draw pain?  What does my pain, the thing, look like?  I have no idea.

Finally, he showed me a drawing someone else had made for him in his office.  It was terribly disturbing, a person’s body with pain on it, and the dreadful, sad colors that one would expect with pain.  I finally understood (a little dense, I am, since the aneurysm).  The painting could be of me in pain.

I went home and tried to write what I saw in my head:

With closed eyes, I see
     zig-zag lines of electricity
       over my body from above
I’m on my knees, facing
     downward, with my arm back,
like a Thanksgiving turkey,
     with emaciated drumsticks
     and wings that swell up 
              and turn bright red
                   to the horror of the guests

Knowing this of me, you probably are thinking it is better I missed Thanksgiving dinner at Melanie’s.

Well, so then I painted my crazy picture, which is remarkable for a few reasons:  first, it’s a second draft, meaning that before you laugh at it, consider that the first was the really juvenile one!  Second, as I look at it with a few days’ distance, I wonder why I chose those colors.  It seems like I should have chosen dismal, disturbing colors, not bright cheerful colors, as though to say, Hi, peeps, isn’t pain just swell?  Third, if I were to include text, wouldn’t it make sense to write the words large enough to read (it’s easier to see them if you click on the picture and see it in a larger size); safe to say, though, that this is not a piece that reflects the artiste in me.

Still, it was a cool assignment.  Dr. A (as in Dr. Philip Appel) is a killer, amazing psychologist at the National Rehabilitation Hospital, who specializes in patients who are managing chronic pain brought about by chronic illness or disability.  He is so good that you almost should get a chronic illness just so that you can go see him.

Anyway, Dr. A. mentioned that at least part of the strength in painting one’s pain is that it allows us to experience the pain as something outside our body, a step towards stepping outside of the pain.  I like that possibility very much.

I wonder if this means I should take the painting, shred it in little pieces, and burn them in effigy tonight…

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Day 357. Approximating Realism.

After Henry Miller by Heidi 11/20/11

I’m posting this monstrosity because Randy and Lana wanted to see paintings.  It truly is a rotten painting to post as exemplary, since it is not my typical style; so think of it as something you can print out for the lining for the bottom of your bird cage.

I’m reading Henry Miller’s book, Paint as you Like and Die Happy. I was trying to paint in the style of his 1950s paintings, which looks much easier than it turns out to be.  Here is one similar to the one I was looking at.

Sooo, it’s back to the watercolor workshop for me.  Today’s lesson:  it is far, far easier to approximate realism than it is to do a really fine abstract piece.  I’m going back to The Tao of Painting, I think, which has an altogether more elegant approach.