Day 246. Weighing the Pain Scale.

One of my favorite bloggers, an amazing college student, writes Simple and Well, a blog about her experience with Hypermobility Ehlers Danlos Syndrome.  It differs from the type I have (Vascular); each of the types shares the main symptoms with the others, the identifiable ones being hypermobility, skin fragility, joint pain, etc.  My symptoms of hypermobility appear on a small scale (causing joint pain), while the activities of daily living cause this blogger’s joints to sublux, or to come out of their sockets.  Rolling over in bed, for example, may cause her hip to come completely out of its socket.  Her shoulder, she writes, has the tendency to “pop,” as do her ankles.

So what does she do?  She tapes up her loose joints for support and goes swimming to get a good workout.  That is one tough young woman.  She is my current hero.

Mosby Pain Scale

Last week, she wrote her own version of a pain scale.  If you haven’t spent much time in the hospital of late, you may not be familiar with the Mosby Pain Rating Scale that incorporates the McCaffrey 1-10 scale numerical reference with words along with the Wong faces scale (image right). I’m particularly fond of the faces of misery that accompany the numerical scores for those of us for whom numbers are particularly meaningless.

The pain scale is a good idea as an attempt to quantify and measure pain empirically, when viewed from the perspective of the nurse, doctor, or pharmacist.  One must measure the pain to treat it. However, from the perspective of a patient, those faces of misery seem laughable. How can they possibly measure pain, an entity that is unquantifiable and incomparable from person to person.

I’ve often thought about this when I have confronted those infernal frowning faces in the hospital or the doctors’ office. How does mundanity of my daily #4, “Hurts a little more,” or on the McCaffery Scale “Moderate,” have any mathematical, or for that matter existential association with the things-are-getting-worse-ness of a #6, “Hurts even more” or on McCaffery still “Moderate.” In fact, I’m still “Moderate” until I am a #7 on McCaffery, which is a long time before a medication decision might be made.  But by the time I am a #7, it may be too late to take a moderate dose of medicine because it is important to treat pain before it becomes too serious; otherwise, it is very difficult to manage.

The rating system becomes more complex because sometimes my leg (where I had an aneurysm rupture) may feel like that face above the #6 “Hurts Even More,” but the rest of my body is pretty okay.  I can manage having that pain better than some other days.  Thus, I can manage taking less pain medication than I would take on a day when I was feeling a #6 AND every joint in my body hurt on top of it.  I wish there was a #6+ or a #6J-with feeling.  That, to me, would have some real empirical value.

Still, I was pretty sure learned from my venture into pain research that I am a big, fat baby. If I were to follow my favorite blogger’s pain scale, I believed that the numerical scores I would assign myself daily would be dramatically lower.  I quite frankly assign pain scores the way America assigns grades on English papers: in a ridiculously inflated fashion.

I have spent the last week or so wondering what that inflation says about me. Do I misunderstand the pain scale? Am I malingering for attention? Love from doctors?  More pain pills? I worry about these things constantly.  I am a baby, no question.  If I just powered through this, I would have less pain.

So then I had a epidural injection on Friday. I absolutely detest getting them, as I guess anyone would hate having a needle poked into a vertebra and into the nerve.  So the doctor uses an X-ray machine to find the nerve precisely; then he injects me with enough local anesthetic so that I don’t jump off the table.  Then, he stimulates that nerve to make sure he has the one that is causing the leg pain—so I feel not exactly pain, but just sensation all the way down my leg and even in the foot where it hurts.  Then, he injects tons of anesthetic, followed by cortisone (which will hopefully block the pain for a few months, until he does it again).

The payoff for the misery of having the injection is standing up and walking off of the operating room table:  about an hour of pain-free walking around.  It hurts like hell in my lower lumbar, where he poked me, but I don’t care.  My leg doesn’t hurt for the first time I can remember.

My doctor’s office building is in Bethesda, kind of a tony address; right across the hall from his office is the snack bar, where one can find the expected coffee and candy bars.  However, the reason we drive 45 minutes to Bethesda instead of seeing the doctor five minutes away in his D.C. office is that the Bethesda snack bar also sells Swarovski crystal barettes and hair things, as well as designer knockoff purses (not that I would ever buy one of those).  So I have about a half hour to walk around this store without having to figure out a way to stand on one leg, or lift it up bent and rest it on the other.  The important thing is, I never even think of my leg this whole time, not how my shoe feels, or whether my sock is cutting into me, how long I have until the pain pill, not one thing. When this happened, I realized that I am not exaggerating when I say that the pain never goes below a #4, even with three narcotics.  When I had a complete nerve block with anesthesia, on an otherwise pretty good day, well now, those pain faces smiled for quite some time.

“Loosey Goosey,” the blogger of Simple and Well, tells me that someone has gone to some trouble to write a better, more sensible comparative pain scale.  This one has some good points; however, I think it is skewed to the lower side.  According to this scale, #5 is pretty intolerable (like trying to walk on a sprained ankle). Uuummm…okay.    Call me inflated all day long, but that just has a lot more seven-ness than five-ness, for me, folks.  Some of the distinctions made to explain the pain, though, are so clear and so apt.  For example at #6, it becomes difficult to hold a job.  Yes!  So clearly it does.

Without a doubt, if the aim is to standardize the description or definition of pain, then more work remains to be done on standardizing the pain scale.  Being able to describe or define your pain may seem esoteric to you, but if you’re in the hospital, in pain, you may find yourself at the mercy of healthcare givers who are suspicious of your motives.  One thing to keep in mind (I learned this thanks to Cathy, who sent me a very interesting journal article): beginning in March 2012, hospitals will receive large amounts of Medicare and Medicaid funding based on the patient evaluation scores they get on pain control.  That means that the government is requiring hospitals to do a good job at controlling your pain in the hospital.  I’m not even on Medicare, and I’ve been surveyed many times already.  So, whether you use the happy and sad faces, or whatever numerical score you devise for yourself, keep in mind, rating your pain may be vital to you in the future.

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9 thoughts on “Day 246. Weighing the Pain Scale.

  1. I’d vote for a cursing scale. It’s an ouch, it hurts like heck, hell, hell and damnation, oh my god, oh sh*t, a m*$*%)f#&@er.

    And I think you have also met one of my other favorite blogger’s pain scales: http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2010/02/boyfriend-doesnt-have-ebola-probably.html

    Wondering if the government means what you and I mean when we say “pain control”? Or do they mean control of the dispensing of pain meds?

    And yes, those Bethesda docs have the most marvelous glittery goodies surrounding them. Cartier’s my joint.

    • Oh my god I am DYING LAUGHING. That is so fucking funny. I have to print it and post it everywhere!!!!! You are brilliant. Or do they mean mind control of those in pain??

      And you do look like a Cartier gal. I am just a snack bar girl of the knockoff purse. And it’s orange. If I were to buy such a bad thing.

  2. Perhaps the trick is to do a compound pain scale. One that takes body parts individually and the overall body as a separate measure. So you can actually be 5 on your right leg, 4 on your arms but 1 on the rest of the body. Limbs, head, torso and “overall,” may be perhaps a way to make things clearer.

    Ultimately, I think that the rule is not to make a level of pain “the new normal” if that can be avoided.

  3. Having had back and leg pain I can relate to those pain charts. Who hasn’t thought… I need to inflate my pain number today or they’ll just give me some ineffective medication and send me on my way. Gimme that epidural! I do prefer the ones with emoticons to the number system, because when you only have 3 minutes to explain 5 weeks of pain (the time required to get the ##^% appointment) a picture is worth a thousand words.

    Also, I am not sure there is much glamour in shopping for baubles in the medical building snack bar. But then it does sound like affordable luxury when you can buy a bag of pork rinds and Swarovski crystals in one stop.

  4. I do like that idea–but I’m still partial to the one Randi posted. That just wins all.

    I agree with you about the New Normal….until it’s been almost four years. Then it’s hard not to think that. KWIM?

    xxo

  5. Pingback: Day 230. A Bump in the Road | heidiwriting

  6. Wow, both you and your fellow blogger are two brave souls.

    I’m so sorry that you are going through all that you are going through.

    Most of all, I hope that medications can help and of course by any other means possible, reach out for the help where you can get it.

    Wishing you all the best and I’ll be following your blog. X

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